Why everyone should ride a Mountain Bike

I’m going to start by saying that this is very much an opinion post, feel free to disagree and we can have a (hopefully civilised) debate in the comments which I can use as an excuse not to go and wash my bike. During the course of a very long and boring car journey home from my favourite trail centre today I had a few thoughts about the benefits of Mountain Biking – being a stereotypical millennial my first thought was to share them on the internet.

Firstly, it’s really good fun. I must admit that long road rides on my own can sometimes be very tedious, on a Mountain Bike getting bored is next to impossible. In fact most of the time you really can’t afford to switch off for fear of falling afoul of a rock, tree stump, root or whatever else the trail might have to throw at you. Today it was a rather bemused looking cow blocking my path that bought this point home. When I’m not feeling particularly motivated to train an MTB ride is always my first port of call, the time passes very quickly.

 

There’s a real sense of adventure that comes along with exploring off-road. GPS can’t always be relied upon and, in the UK at least, bridleways tend to be poorly signposted. The advantage of this is that getting a bit (okay sometimes very) lost is a brilliant way of discovering new places. Yesterday for example I found myself riding alongside a dried up riverbed which I couldn’t help but go down and walk along. It’s strangely satisfying to know where all those obscure tracks that you’ve ridden past lead to.

 

For me another bonus comes with the sense of tranquility that comes along when you’re in the middle of nowhere. After a long day at work there’s nothing quite like riding to my favourite spot, sitting down and switching off for a minute or two. No phone signal, no cars to worry about and no Strava segments to chase, it’s the perfect antidote to a bad race or any other setback be it cycling related or otherwise.

 

 

My second argument for embracing the knobbly tyres is that it’s brilliant training. Off-road riding is the perfect way to get in an interval session for people who don’t like intervals. Generally speaking you’re either coasting or riding very hard, it’s not uncommon to encounter climbs so steep that you can’t make it all the way up them. You’ll make mincemeat of most road climbs once you’ve negotiated a few 25% gradients on a 15kg mountain bike.

Many of the skills Mountain Biking requires also come in very useful for the road. Here’s an example. When it comes to cornering you’ll often be told to look for the exit of the turn and use that to pick your line and judge the speed, always braking before the corner and letting go once you enter it. In practice that’s not always possible, very often you can’t see the exit of the corner which makes judging the correct entrance speed very difficult – in other words unless it’s a familiar bend you have to brake whilst going round it. That braking will force you to take the corner more slowly than you’d otherwise be-able to for fear of the wheels locking up. In the context of a race that means you’ll often end up having to sprint after the corner to catch up with the riders in front. To some people this is probably intuitive but for me it certainly wasn’t until I started riding trails – if you brake before the corner and then release only the front brake you can safely carry more speed whilst maintaining control should it be needed. That piece of wisdom has made me a much, much better descender on the road – to the point where I was actually able to make up some places on the downhill sections in my last road race. Looking back I’d go as far as to say that I wish I’d ridden MTB from day one.

This next point might not be so relevant for riders who are lucky enough to live in places where the weather is good all year round. Riding on UK roads in winter is often a character building experience, you’ll have to deal with mud, debris, well concealed potholes and from time to time black ice. On a rim braked road bike it’s bloody miserable. My Mountain Bike however tackles that terrain with ease, hell I’ve ridden it in deep snow and managed to stay upright – that humble hardtail succeeded where many cars failed spectacularly. I don’t feel guilty about getting that bike dirty and scratched – it’s what the it’s designed for. Put simply that machine makes winter riding safer and more enjoyable.

Another thing I think we roadies could learn a great deal from is the willingness of the mountain bike world to adopt new technologies. Equipment that has only for the most part only recently become relatively commonplace on road bikes all originated in Mountain Biking; 1x drivetrains, disc brakes and thru-axles are the ones that come to mind. Again, this is purely opinion but in a few years time I bet we’ll see road going machines specced with suspension and dropper seat posts.

For what it’s worth here are my two cents. If you’ve never dabbled in Mountain Biking before I’d definitely recommend giving it a try. In my case it’s revolutionised my winter training and lead to a lot of summer fun. I’ve learned useful skills and discovered some amazing places.  Finally it can be done relatively cheaply – my £375 second hand hardtail certainly hasn’t held me back – at least nowhere near as much as my poor off-roading skills.

Thanks for reading.

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