Bike SOS

Hi folks. This time round I’m going to take a break from the racing updates and ramble on about something that should be an equally effective sleep aid for any non-Cyclists reading this. In a bid to improve my mechanical skills and save some money on bike shop repair bills I took on two project bikes this summer – three months later one of them is actually finished, honestly.

Here was the starting point, please excuse the terrible photo quality. A 2016 Boardman Road Sport that had been left outside for a year gathering rust. My aim was simple, restore it back to good working order.

I realised the extent of the task that lay ahead of me when I tried to take the wheels off in order to get the bike in my car. The quick release skewers were so seized that I had to use a pair of pliers to undo them. Upon turning the frame upside down to do this half the river nile came out of the chain stays. I soon realised that the chain was beyond saving – the thing was so rusted that it refused to turn.

It was clear that the bike needed a full strip-down and rebuild if it was ever going to get out on the road again. A long evening was spent taking the machine apart, I was pleasantly surprised by how easy this was – until I realised that at some point I was going to have to put the thing back together again.

The first stage consisted of working out what could be saved and what needed replacing. The bar tape, chain and cables were well beyond redemption. I initially hoped the bottom bracket could be re-used once I’d managed to liberate it using an improvised tool. I then turned my attention to the bolts. Surprisingly all but a few of them were in decent condition barring some surface rust. I turned to an old-school technique and soaked them all in vinegar overnight alongside the chainrings, cassette, headset bearings and any washers I’d managed to salvage.

The next step was reconditioning the components I was planning to re-use. The brakes had certainly seen better days, fortunately all that was required to bring them back into service was some elbow grease. I fully disassembled both callipers, cleaned and greased everything individually and then put them back together. I’ll admit to being very pleased at how nicely they turned out in the end.

Likewise the shifters looked very tired, both hoods were perished and needed replacing. This threw up an unexpected problem, no matter how hard I looked it was impossible to find like for like replacements. The closest I could get was a pair of ultra 6600 covers which unfortunately needed to be cut down to size.

Finally it was the turn of the wheels, surprisingly the freehub was in good condition and didn’t need anything besides a good clean. The bearings on the front didn’t sound quite as healthy but fortunately didn’t turn out to be worn – removing, cleaning and re-greasing them solved the issue.

Now came the bit I’d been afraid of. Sorting out the frame – initially I’d hoped it would only need cleaning and polishing but the condition of the paint work suggested otherwise. I have to admit that painting the frame myself was beyond my skill level, fortunately my Father is rather good with a spray can so that bit was left to him. The process was a simple but time consuming one; sand down the frame, apply primer, colour and finally lacquer.

It was then time to re-assemble the bike. I started off with the easiest sections, installing the reconditioned headset, fork and handlebars before putting the wheels back on so as to make the bike easier to work on. Next came the brakes and rear mech. The bottom bracket itself was perfectly serviceable but when I tried to re-install it I found that the threads on the frame had been damaged. Fortunately I managed to find a threadless model that fitted perfectly and spun far more smoothly than the original.

From then on the process proved relatively straightforward. Refitting the chainset, shifters, chain and front mech was surprisingly painless. I decided to fit the bike with a straight stem I had going spare rather than the positive original – by my own admission this was purely for cosmetic reasons. Next came the job of linking everything together, most of the original cable outers were in good condition though some had to be replaced. Luckily I had a few left over from project bike number two. I will admit there were a few minor teething problems when it came to fitting the cables, having never worked on that type of shifter before – the language on that afternoon soon went from PG to 18+.

The final step was to set-up the gears and brakes. Having done this a few times and made just about every mistake it’s possible to make at some point I felt fairly well versed. Once everything worked with the bike on a stand I took it out on the road, knowing that a few final tweaks would probably have to be made. I wasn’t surprised to find the chain regularly coming off on the front and slightly noisy shifting at the rear. Putting it right was simply a matter of adjusting cable tension and checking the limit screws on both mechs.

So, here’s the finished product. I’d like to think it’s an improvement on the original, though admittedly that wouldn’t be hard. Hopefully this bike will soon be back out on the road where it belongs.

Thanks for reading.

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